buffalo smoke-2

5 thoughts on “buffalo smoke-2

  1. Bob:
    Where there’s smoke there’s fire!

    We get a little effort worth the cold here too…”cold enough for ice to form on the tip of my rod..”

    Easy fix- dip it in the river.
    No ice will form on the tip during the whip.

    “….how nice it would be if all animals, human especially, would just go on about their business (take the chest) in peace, as we did that morning…”

    The last sentence of Buffalo Smoke- “There must be a moral in there somewhere”

    Moral- the treasure is in Yellowstone Park

    Is that why they made burgers out of Cody because he is the blaze. Bob you been Wisand found the blaze 🙂

    The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) finds its earliest evidence of bison in a Latin form, bisontes, in the late 1300s, but the word, along with the animal, then disappears from the record. It resurfaces in the 1600s, especially in historical texts like the King James Bible and classical translations. Come the 1690s, European explorers applied bison, also first in Latin form, to its new-world counterpart, Bison bison, where the word now largely roams.

    Bison indeed derives from the Latin bison. English either borrowed it directly or from a French intermediary. But the word was probably not a native species to the Latin. Rome likely borrowed its word for this roamer from a Germanic source, which historical linguists represent in *wisand, itself likely migrating from a Balto-Slavic home.

    Germanic languages helped populate this *wisand’s herd, including the Old English wesend. This word is as extinct as the mammal from the Isles. Except for an unlikely cognate: weasel. The bison and weasel certainly make for the sort of odd couple we’d only expect to find in a Disney movie, but their names, some etymologists believe, share a common root that notes the musky odor they emit, especially when rutting. Literally, they are the “stinking animals.”

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  2. Forrest sure uses the word nickel a lot in TTOTC. seems like everything cost a nickel when he was a tyke. and since he was born in 1930 the only nickel available at the time was the buffalo nickel. its odd they called it the buffalo nickel because the buffalo was on the obverse. most coins are nicknamed after the image on the front of the coin. usually a president. the indian who appears on the front of the buffalo nickel is Iron Tail. a friend of buffalo bill.
    when young Forrest ditched school he slid down the old IRON fire escape which marked the TAIL of his britches. it was 1938 when the jefferson nickel came out. Forrest also talks about sliding nickels on the grave of the pineapple pie lady. indians did that too at buffalo bills grave. sure are lots of hints to buffalo bill in TTOTC. my feeling is if buffalo bill is not included in your solution to the poem, then it is wrong.

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  3. Where there’s smoke there’s fire!

    We get a little effort worth the cold here too…”cold enough for ice to form on the tip of my rod..”

    Easy fix- dip it in the river.
    No ice will form on the tip during the whip.

    “….how nice it would be if all animals, human especially, would just go on about their business (take the chest) in peace, as we did that morning…”

    The last sentence of Buffalo Smoke- “There must be a moral in there somewhere”

    Moral- the treasure is in Yellowstone Park

      (Quote)

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