Book Signing 11/02/13

Too Far to Walk book signing at Moby Dickens Book Shop, Taos, New Mexico, November 2, 2013.

 

43 thoughts on “Book Signing 11/02/13

  1. inthechaseto: jdh –

    If you ever want to find the TC –you will need coordinates – you will not wander upon it.they don’t come in words and cannot be found “in” the poem but by the poem.

    Coordinates may or may not be in there but there are definitely hints in the book that you need to decipher the clues in the poem. For example, the answer to the poem’s question is found in My War for Me. F tells us that he wrote the poem using meanings of words that he had to look up. So the words themselves are important. But he also said that he drew the poem like an architect. That tells me that the structure and the presentation of the poem contains clues. The number of lines, words, clues sentences may all be relevant.

    Along those lines, I think that Me in the Middle is an example of how he placed hints in the book to help with the poem. The poem appears in the book perfectly centered in the middle of the page. The middle page of the book is the beginning of MWFM chapter. Me in the Middle talks of him looking up to his father and brother but he was not able to look down on his sister. The poem tells you to look quickly down. The middle line of the poem is line 12- “Just heavy loads and water high” IMO that is a key phrase for the solve. So to solve the poem you need to understand the meaning of the words but you also need to understand the structure of the poem and how the architect designed it. Many of the hints to that are found in the book.

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  2. jdh:

    I don’t have any part of my solution using numbers (9 or 24 or any others) as you describe. But if I did I would certainly look for those types of clue solutions.

    I expect words to describe it, just as “not far, but too far to walk” describes the solution at this point of the hunt.

    jdh

    jdh –

    If you ever want to find the TC – you will need coordinates – you will not wander upon it. they don’t come in words and cannot be found “in” the poem but by the poem.

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    • Well, I would respectfully disagree with that and almost everything else on this thread, except for the comments by jdh, which I believe are on the right track.

      Halogetter

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      • Everything that is posted is just conjecture, nothing certain until the treasure is found. Its interesting to see how many different opinions there are. I am looking forward to the solve to see how far off we all are. 🙂

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        • You are so right Deb –

          And you always say it so nicely.

          After reading about other successful treasure hunters – they always used every resource available to them.

          We are lucky to have the internet which holds a wealth of knowledge – we could never research it all.

          I see people now hiring other people to aid them in their search. Smart idea. If you don’t know about something – hire someone. Just make sure that who you hire is smart enough to get it right.

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          • You’re kidding me, right? Hiring people to do their thinking? That is beyond rediculous. Why bother? Half of it will be the pride in knowing that you personally figured it out.

            I wonder how much it costs to pay someone else to think for you? LOL

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    • inthechaseto,

      I agree that no one will wander upon the chest. Why do I believe that? Because Mr. Fenn said as much. He also said the poem is all a person needs.

      If the poem is all a person needs, then the poem will indicate that coordinates are needed and where to get them. But if the “where” to get them is outside the poem, I don’t see how Mr. Fenn can say the poem is all that’s needed.

      jdh

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      • When he said the poem is all that is needed – I think he was talking about needing the book. You don’t need the book to find the coordinates. It’s helpfull yes, but not needed. I think he said that, so people would know – he wasn’t just trying to sell books and make money off the treasure hunt. I think you need a computer to find the co’s.

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  3. I personally believe it is buried and have thought that from the very start. With that being said i really don’t think it matters one way or the other. Once you crack the poem the exact location of the chest will reveal itself. You will have so much confidence in the location you’ll have no choice but to dig, metal detector or not. Plus i think the blaze will confirm the exact location.

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  4. Buried?? yes or no, but let me ask you this>>>> When you get to your spot where you think the chest in ‘HID’ and you do NOT see it, you will walk away?, with out checking the area for an hour or so with a Metal detector???? Not I . Of course in a Natl Park and most State Parks it is not legal to dig or use a Metal Detector. But on the Tens of thousands of acres of BLM managed lands it is Legal.

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    • Musstag- I have to tell you and everyone else… I could have dug as deep as I wanted to every where I have been in Yellowstone, sinks canyon, wind river canyon, thermopolis, Yankee Jim canyon.
      I could have carried the box of gold and driven all the way back to Florida with it, undetected.
      I don’t care what anybody says about BLM land or state parks or national parks, I could have found the treasure and got away scot free with it. True statement.
      I could have held it in the air as people were driving by anywhere I went and said ” hey!!! I found Forrest Fenn’s treasure!!!” they would have just went right on by me and looked at me like I was crazy… Nobody would have cared or questioned me.

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  5. Liv:
    As I’ve said before, I’m inclined towards buried under his headstone (the blaze), but I don’t understand why doesn’t he want to give it as a clue.
    Is he afraid that knowing it’s buried, people would take more time and do a more thorough search?

    if F came out and clearly said it was buried, take whatever grief he has received for searchers disrupting and damaging nature and multiply by 100

    he will never, well maybe i shouldnt say never but i know he really really does not want to , say it is buried

    he needs serious searchers to understand that it is without him having to come out and say it

    i think recent words coming out of his mouth may be a compromise, he is trying to drop big hints w/o saying it

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  6. inthechaseto:
    Do you think a pinpointer would be better than a metal detector?

    It’s easier to carry for one thing. If you want to sweep a lot of “ground” I would say a metal detector but areas in and around boulders or just a small fixed ground area the pinpoint works better because it doesn’t have the big head like the metal detector. Not to mention not as obvious if your on someone’s or government land.

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    • I do carry my pin point metal detector with me now just in case, but also some of the niches are hard to see in and feel around not to mention what might be in them. So the pinpoint attached to a stick helps, it can pick up something the size of the chest 8 to 10 inches from it.

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      • Bur –

        Would your pinpointer work if it were buried – say 12 inches down?

        I wonder what could he have used to surround it.? I just don’t think he placed that pretty box in the dirt with out protecting it in someway.

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        • Inthechaseto IMO he could of covered it with small rocks under or in a opening in or around boulders. I’ve seen the ground in both Wyoming and Colorado and virgin land is hard and hard to dig in and at 80 unless there was a natural hole he could push a little top dirt in I don’t think he could dig something 12″ deep actually it would have to be more if you thinking 12″ of dirt on top. Into, there are ways of setting the pinpoint to pic up father from a object but I have mine set for a easy 10 ” for that size of a object.

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        • Musstag, you need to update your pinpointer, mine does 10 ” air space easy and 4″ of dirt easy too. I set mine for bronze metal since I just happen have a bronze box.

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          • Well I guess you are right about the depth you pinpointer works at, Mine is an inch max, designed that way, so that you can work a hole that your digging and know if your close, using the MD to know where to dig the hole and for the 10 inch depth hunt. My Garrett Master Pro Hunter MD won;t detect a metal box that size in the dirt more than 12 inches deep.

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    • As I’ve said before, I’m inclined towards buried under his headstone (the blaze), but I don’t understand why doesn’t he want to give it as a clue.
      Is he afraid that knowing it’s buried, people would take more time and do a more thorough search?
      I don’t think it would help much, maybe a little.
      The person that will find it, would have solved the poem in its entirety… me thinks, and probably get it without any MD.

      Without solving it, one can only have a general area, and as nobody give their exact spots, it probably happens that thousands of people search the same areas, over and over again.

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  7. Probably most people got this, but I thought of mention it here.

    At 34:18 he says “that’s why I told people that I buried the tre… that I hid the treasure”

    So… is it buried?

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    • Liv I believe he might have covered it up so that it is not noticeable if your in area, now with all the time since he hid it Mother Nature could have covered it with debris like dirt, leaves, branches from wind snow or rain. So it can be buried but I don’t think Fenn did.

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    • I waver back and forth on this. So many contradictions in the whole thing. The illustration in TFTW woukd point to concealed in the soil. Does that mean anything? Maybe not.

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      • Yes I waver about wether it buried or not. And why won;t or why doesn’t he want to say, could it be because of the rules in Natl and State Parks. If he sez its not buried does he feel we will think if its not buried is because its in a Natl or State park? Or if it is buried we may think (rightly or wrong) that its NOT in a Natl or State Park because that would be against the law to dig to hide it and to dig to find it. SO YES, why is it that he won’t commit to the fact of its buried or Not? But if its buried in a Natl or State Park…. that would be bad news, as a clue for sure. So, maybe its buried in a Natl or State Park, and thats why he can’t tell us… If I was Hiding it, it would be covered with at least several inches of dirt or something….

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        • Like most others, I personally think it could be buried. But that could mean in a hole with a stone slab cover, in a rock pile on top of the ground surface, in the crevice of a rock wall or even “buried” in the clues of the poem.

          However, I think the poem needs to tell us if it is. “Look quickly down” could be the indicator, but SOMETHING in the poem needs to tell us. Just as SOMETHING needs to tell us where\what specifically WWWH is. It needs to be specific. So if I find nothing in the poem that tells me it is buried, I will not look for a “buried” treasure.

          And if I have to dig for it, I expect the poem to tell me how deep to dig. Not the book, not the interviews, not the bells… the poem.

          For me, everything needed is in the poem.

          jdh

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          • jdh-
            How about 24 lines, no x (24th letter), trail is described in stanzas 2 through 4, = buried 24 inches deep.
            Or 9 clues, 9 sentences = buried 9 inches deep.

            Is that your line of thinking? Or do you think words will describe? Just curious. It’s an interesting idea.

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          • Jack,

            I don’t have any part of my solution using numbers (9 or 24 or any others) as you describe. But if I did I would certainly look for those types of clue solutions.

            I expect words to describe it, just as “not far, but too far to walk” describes the solution at this point of the hunt.

            jdh

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