Poem 1:2

And with my treasures bold,

19 thoughts on “Poem 1:2

  1. Into & wolf,
    Sadly Hugette Clark became a complete recluse with a penchant for dolls and expensive elaborately crafted Japanese dollhouses constructed at $40k. Her mother’s Santa Barbara home sat vacant but immaculately maintained for 40 years. Hugette was a fair artist and played her Strad violins well. Relatives lived her but rarely saw her.

    Hugette’s father on the other hand is a Hugely interesting man in Montana history who lived to be 102, and the fought off Blackfoot Indians on the first pony express route west thru Missoula and Helena, before he went into gold conveyance, banking and mining.

    into:
    Anna and Wolf –
    My, my !Heiress Huguette Clark – is an interesting study indeed !

    This is written by Bill Dedman…….

    www.readanybook.com/ebook/empty-mansions-the-mysterious-life-of-huguette-clark-and-the-spending-of-a-great-american-fortune-565407

    Public records led me to a third residence. Huguette Clark owned not one but three apartments in a classic limestone building in New York City, at 907 Fifth Avenue, overlooking Central Park at Seventy-Second Street. Its a neighborhood of legend and fantasy, near the statue of Alice in Wonderland and the pond where the
    boy-mouse Stuart Little raced sailboats. Yes, sir, said No. 907s uniformed doorman, in his Russian accent, this is Madame Clarks building. But no, he hadn’t seen Madame or any other Clarks for about twenty years, although he had carried groceries for Martha Stewart, who had a pied-à-terre in the same building. He shrugged, as if to say that doormen see a lot of strange things.

    Huguette had been famous in her childhood and was famous again more than a century later, but in between shed been a phantom. The last known photograph of her, a snapshot of a uncomfortable
    heiress in furs, jewels, and a cloche hat in the fashionable bell shape, had been taken in 1928. She had managed to escape the worlds gaze since then. How and more important, why?

    Urging further investigation, one of Huguettes own bankers confided to me, The whole story is utterly mysterious but equally
    frightening. It has all the markings of a massive fraud. Poor Miss Clark sounds like one in a long list of rich, isolated old ladies taken advantage of by supposedly trustworthy advisers.
    ……………………………..
    And now, since we have dolls popping up in the chase –

    www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2418246/Heiress-Huguette-Clark-refused-leave-Fifth-Avenue-penthouse-hid-DOLLS.html

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  2. We now know Forrest continues to use a particular stamp. It’s located in SB’s 132 and 107.

    dalneitzel.com/2015/02/22/scrapbook-one-hundred-thirty-two/

    dalneitzel.com/2014/11/12/scrapbook-one-hundred-seven/

    This stamp might be located in one other SB – not sure about that. If you find it – pls let me know.

    In my mind – it is a hint that continues to pop up………….

    There are many different “Forever” stamps. The word “Forever” is always on the stamp.

    The first Forever Stamp went on sale in April 2007 and it featured an image of the Liberty Bell. In 2011, all first-class one ounce stamps became forever stamps with the exception of stamps in coils of 500, 3,000, and 10,000. As the name suggests, Forever Stamps can be used to mail a one-ounce letter regardless of when the stamps are purchased or used and no matter how prices may change in the future.
    Forever Stamps are always sold at the same price as a regular First-Class Mail stamp. The Postal Service developed the Forever Stamp for
    consumers ease of use during price changes. They are sold in sheets and booklets of 20. Customers can use Forever Stamps for
    international mail, but since all international prices are higher than domestic prices, customers will need to attach additional postage.
    The value of the Forever Stamp is the domestic First-Class Mail letter price in effect on the day of use.

    The forever Stamp – The Star Spangled Banner.

    Forever 49¢
    The Star-Spangled Banner Stamps feature a treasured American icon ever since Francis Scott Key celebrated the sight of an American flag still flying over Fort McHenry during the War of 1812.

    This stamp commemorates the 200th anniversary of the Star-Spangled Banner with a photograph of the flag that flies over Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine in Baltimore. This flag is a replica of the one that inspired Key to write “The Star-Spangled Banner”after Fort McHenry withstood the British attack of September 13-14, 1814.

    Photographer Gary Clark took the picture of the flag against a backdrop of fireworks during an annual celebration of Defenders’ Day. Defenders’ Day, according to the NationalParkService,is “Baltimore’s oldest holiday commemorating the bombardment of Fort McHenry and the writing of ‘The Star-Spangled Banner.’” Clark said it was a challenge to get the fireworks and the flag in the same shot and that “the wind picked up quite a bit that night.” Art director Phil Jordan designed the stamp.
    Forever stamps are always equal in value to the current First-Class Mail® one-ounce rate.

    Issue Date: January 28, 2014
    store.usps.com/store/browse/uspsProductDetailMultiSkuDropDown.jsp?categoryNavIds=buy-stamps%3astamps-by-type%3aforever-stamps&categoryNav=false&navAction=push&navCount=0&atg.multisite.remap=false&categoryId=forever-stamps&productId=S_689004

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    • Into thanks for the Info. Well, there is a connection to the Poem. Remember the flashing lights that Forrest experienced in Vietnam. I feel that part of the story talks about the fireworks that could be seen while he hid the chest.

      ” So hear me all and listen good, your effort will be worth the cold”

      There is fireworks relating to this line. Enjoy everyone.

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      • Thanks Gey,

        What I don’t get is why a person wouldn’t always buy “Forever” stamps – as they hold their value “Forever”. I didn’t know that something like that existed. Well, I guess if everyone knew that – it would break the post office eventually. All you have to do is “ask” for them. 🙂

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      • Into that is a very good observation. I noted this back when that SB came out as well but thought I was biased because it lined up with my solution. I like it when others not the same thing as it removes the bias.

        His book has postage stamps with the wrong dates (classify as aberration). Of course that could be a nice hint to 49 or 49th parallel. As you know I have provided overwhelming evidence of Canada as the hoB.

        It was interesting that when Forrest gave that post on Skippy blowing himself up with fireworks, I thought of that stamp too. What made it more interesting that Forrest gave that story to Dal on the Anniversary of the biggest explosion at the time in 1895 in Butte, Mt.
        mtstandard.com/news/local/deadly-disaster-firefighters-onlookers-perish-in-explosion/article_1baf0ff6-e502-11e1-91c6-0019bb2963f4.html

        Note the dead horses (Hemingway For whom the bells toll). That photograph just happen to be about 60 feet away from where I had traced the nine clues a year ago. I reasoned that canyon down was “Kenyon down” as in Kenyon Connell building that was at ground zero of the explosion.

        To my surprise when FF gave that Skippy being blown up with Fireworks SB the exact date that illegal dynamite storage area was blown up in Butte. The explosion wiped out the entire hook and ladder Fire department in Butte (save two people).

        I mean what are the odds of FF posting a fireworks explosion the same day as an dynamite explosion that levelled the city? So you know why I found that stamp with fireworks interesting.

        One other thing. Remember when FF talked about the vulnerability of the treasure being similar to the twin towers/911 event? That is very similar to the Butte explosion and the relationship to the NYFD.

        I should add that The significance of that SB was how Forrest met Peggy. When it comes to important events in one’s life, the day and place and circumstances that you meet your spouse has to be on the top of the list.

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        • Hello Wolf, I always enjoy reading your interpretations, and as a native Montanan your factually supported, well-reasoned Butte solve makes me smile…ok, chuckle. my fellow Montanans who don’t reside in Butte call it Butt America due to its toxic mile deep hole courtesy of 100 yrs of copper mining. My solve had an actual butt shaped hill which fit the poem nicely! Lol:-)

          You may enjoy reading “Empty Mansions” a biography of the Copper Kings who put Butte on the map at the turn of the century.
          Best to you and yours for a blessed holiday season.

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          • Thank you Anna for the feedback. As you may already know, the significance of Butte is the toxic pool. “AS I went alone…” AS being the symbol for arsenic comes from copper mining and linked to kidney cancer.

            And “Butt” is in the poem and one can only imagine why he had to put in the old outhouses comment.. And it is hinted in the book with Fluttery. Butt-r-fly. “r” stands for rotary wing and the circular reference and thus “fly” hints to helicopter.

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          • Anna and Wolf –
            My, my ! Heiress Huguette Clark – is an interesting study indeed !

            This is written by Bill Dedman…….

            www.readanybook.com/ebook/empty-mansions-the-mysterious-life-of-huguette-clark-and-the-spending-of-a-great-american-fortune-565407

            Public records led me to a third residence. Huguette Clark owned not one but three apartments in a classic limestone building in New York City, at 907 Fifth Avenue, overlooking Central Park at Seventy-Second Street. Its a neighborhood of legend and fantasy, near the statue of Alice in Wonderland and the pond where the
            boy-mouse Stuart Little raced sailboats. Yes, sir, said No. 907s uniformed doorman, in his Russian accent, this is Madame Clarks building. But no, he hadn’t seen Madame or any other Clarks for about twenty years, although he had carried groceries for Martha Stewart, who had a pied-à-terre in the same building. He shrugged, as if to say that doormen see a lot of strange things.

            Huguette had been famous in her childhood and was famous again more than a century later, but in between shed been a phantom. The last known photograph of her, a snapshot of a uncomfortable
            heiress in furs, jewels, and a cloche hat in the fashionable bell shape, had been taken in 1928. She had managed to escape the worlds gaze since then. How and more important, why?

            Urging further investigation, one of Huguettes own bankers confided to me, The whole story is utterly mysterious but equally
            frightening. It has all the markings of a massive fraud. Poor Miss Clark sounds like one in a long list of rich, isolated old ladies taken advantage of by supposedly trustworthy advisers.
            ……………………………..
            And now, since we have dolls popping up in the chase –

            www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2418246/Heiress-Huguette-Clark-refused-leave-Fifth-Avenue-penthouse-hid-DOLLS.html

              (Quote)

  3. inthe,

    He has said it is not in a dangerous place so I’m leaning towards the opposite. That doesn’t mean there won’t be perilous paths along the way.
    I like the idea of “middle” being part of it. That was part of an earlier solution of mine. I’ll have to look closer to see how it fits with my current one. Although I currently have 4 reference points I’m trying to work out. After connecting some dots, the middle just may show the X spot.

    jdh

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  4. jdh –

    I think you are right on in your assessment.

    The fact that he went with family – at least at sometime – maybe not when he placed the treasure there – but at another time. It is being bold to go in there alone – no one does that – ever – it would be a dangerous feat – as there is always the risk of falling rocks, avalanche – car break down – flooding, not to mention that he could fall himself – without cell phone service and so no way to call for help. If indeed he did that – he was very brave. But, we all know he has been brave in the past – and so perhaps it’s just is part of his nature. It’s the only way he could have done this with out chance of someone being around.

    So for all that are listening – that one piece of knowledge should narrow down your search area a great deal. If you think about this further – this means he could have parked anywhere he wanted – and not in a designated parking place. He could have parked in the middle of the road – oh and by the way, I think being in the middle is important. So if he parked in the middle of the road – that makes your search area a lot wider – sorry.

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  5. Why was BOLD used in this line?

    I see this line as saying he has been to the site with at least two family members (family being his real treasures). I take it to be the family he grew up with since they’re all gone, and he can keep the secret, but I can’t see how BOLD fits.

    Is BOLD just a word to rhyme with OLD? I think this is least likely.

    BOLD can mean to show prominence, so is that the intent in this line or stanza? Is this the blaze we are supposed to find, referenced in a later line?

    Did Mr. Fenn “gone alone in there” and after seeing no one else present, then went BOLDLY with the chest, or contents, knowing no one would see him?

    I think I know Mr. Fenn’s answer would be… “yes”
    but I’d like to see what others think and why.

    If you think disclosing your ideas of one word in one stanza will give away too much of your solution, I’ll understand. But if you’re brave… and in the mood, perhaps you’ll share.

    TIA
    jdh

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      • Lots of BOLDness in the videos. Too bad today’s LEGO kits tell the child what to build instead of letting them create it on their own.

        Funny stuff though.

        jdh

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    • Well, as with all things Fenn we have many choices to this word. I always look up the definition of the word and consider all options when thinking about the book, the poem,and Forrests life and interests. There is always more than one way to take every word used.

      Ask yourself what does ff treasure? How would bold apply to that idea? I would be willing to bet you already know the answer. Was that clear as mud? 🙂

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